Has ASOS changed fashion for the better? #MontageMashup

Hello… welcome to the latest #MontageMashup, where each week we bring you the latest news and views from across the marketing industry. In this week’s mashup, we’re applauding ASOS for its move toward inclusive clothing, celebrating YoSushi’s Pride partnership, looking at Hearst UK’s new engagement-quality metric, and more! So, let’s get started…

ASOS creates inclusive clothing

Accessible fashion has been the aim of ASOS’s recent collaboration with Chloe Ball-Hopkins. The Great British Paralympic hopeful is modelling and championing the brand’s new disability-friendly item. The piece was designed to make ‘fashion that is accessible for everybody’. It’s a jumpsuit that is perfect for festival season: it’s waterproof, brightly coloured and tie-dye. Festivals aside, Ball-Hopkins is currently in training for the 2020 Paralympics in Tokyo. Disability charity Scope praised the collaboration, saying: it’s ‘great to see big brands like ASOS tapping into the disabled consumer market’.

The ‘Gareth Southgate effect’ sees waistcoat sales rise

If there was something you could have predicted to come out of this year’s World Cup, would it have been a rise in waistcoat sales? It’s doubtful, but the fact remains true nevertheless. After a number of appearances in what has been dubbed his ‘lucky waistcoat’, England manager Gareth Southgate has single handedly increased sales of the clothing item from a by-gone era. M&S has reported a rise of 35% and eBay has witnessed an increase of 25% in waistcoat sales. England football fans are saying goodbye to football shirts and hello to stylish waistcoats. Who’d have thought?!

YoSushi proud supporters of Pride and LGBT+ community

Last weekend was London Pride and one brand in particular showed themselves to be true LGBT+ ambassadors. YoSushi opted to remove all of its branded packaging, as an endeavour to promote its ‘No Labels. Just pride.’ concept. In addition to this, the sushi company is encouraging people to share its selection of seven rainbow plates, with a limited time offer of £20. A £1 donation from each purchase will be given to UK Pride Organisers Network. So head on down to London, get some sushi, and get colourful!

Engagement quality metric launched by Hearst UK

Ever wondered how engaged an audience really is? Hearst UK has come up with a solution to your pondering. The metric Engaged View Rate (EVR) will measure how many times a person views a piece of content for more than 30 seconds and whether 75% or more of the page has been scrolled. While reach has been the go-to metric for a number of years, this update aims to provide a more in-depth analysis of user activity. Clare Gorman, Chief Operations Director of Hearst UK, says: ‘EVR demonstrates Hearst’s commitment to delivering meaningful results for our commercial partners’ and cites ‘deliver[ing] effective ROI’ as an aim of EVR.

Lastly, ASA takes a bite out of Chewits and Cadbury…

The Advertising Standards Authority is cracking down on brands that market products high in sugar, salt or fat to children under the age of sixteen. Cadbury was criticised for marketing an online storybook towards young children. The story, ‘The Tale of the Great Easter Bunny’ was part of a collaboration with The National Trust for Scotland: it encouraged children to try a range of ‘Eggciting Activities’ and, ultimately, to eat chocolate. Chewits came under fire for marketing Chewie the Chewitsaurus-related activity (the brand’s mascot) to children similarly underage. After the imposition of these new limits, it will certainly be interesting to see how retailers respond!

Don’t forget to check out next week’s #MontageMashup, right here on the blog!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

About the author

Lilli Hender